Research Grant Opportunities

  

  

 

PAST GRANT OPPORTUNITIES

New Grant Opportunity from the NIH Therapeutics for Rare and Neglected Diseases Program!

The first solicitation for collaborative projects in the new NIH Therapeutics for Rare and Neglected Disease <http://trnd.nih.gov/> (TRND) program is now open at the online application website ProposalCentral https://proposalcentral.altum.com/default.asp?GMID=80> .

The application deadline for the first cycle of this solicitation is December 6th, 2010.

TRND will, in collaboration with successful applicant partners, develop clinical candidates for rare and neglected diseases.  Collaborators can be academic, biotechnology, pharmaceutical, or foundation researchers, domestic or foreign.  Minimal entry criteria for the program are in the attached summary;  TRND flyer 2010  additional information is available at the TRND website: www.trnd.nih.gov

Pre-Announcement Notice: Department of Defense Funding Opportunity

DOD Bone Marrow Failure Research Program
The Fiscal Year 2010 (FY10) Defense Appropriations Act provides $3.75 million to the Department of Defense Bone Marrow Failure Research Program (BMFRP) to understand and cure bone marrow failure diseases.

The BMFRP challenges the scientific community to design innovative research that will advance the understanding of inherited and acquired bone marrow failure diseases, to improve the health and life of individuals living with these diseases, with the ultimate goal of prevention and/or cure. This program is administered by the US Army Medical Research and Materiel Command through the Office of the Congressionally Directed Medical Research Programs (CDMRP).

 The FY10 BMFRP award mechanisms can be found at http://cdmrp.army.mil/pubs/press/2010/10bmfrppreann.htm

Mechanism-specific Program Announcements/Funding Opportunities, including submission deadlines, and General Application Instructions are anticipated to be posted on the Grants.gov and CDMRP websites in late January/early February 2010!   (http://www.grants.gov and http://cdmrp.army.mil).

This year two award mechanisms will be offered:

Exploration-Hypothesis Development:

  • Supports initial exploration of innovative, untested, high-risk, potentially high-gain, and possibly groundbreaking concept
  • Maximum funding of $100,000 in direct costs (plus indirect costs)
  • Maximum Period of performance is 18 months
  • Anticipate 6 awards

New Investigator Awards:

  • Assistant Professor (or equivalent) and within 6 years
  • Supports innovative research and the career transition and/or continued development of investigators in the early stages of their careers
  • Scientific and career goals in bone marrow failure research should be addressed
  • Preliminary data and/or published data relevant to the proposed project should be included
  • Maximum funding of $400,000 in direct costs (plus indirect costs)
  • Maximum Period of performance is 3 years
  • Anticipate 4 awards

 

GOVERNMENT GRANT OPPORTUNITY AVAILABLE!!

Title:  Stimulating Hematology Investigation:  New Endeavors (SHINE) (R01)

Opening Date: January 5, 2010 (Earliest date an application may be submitted to Grants.gov)

Program Announcement (PA) Number: PAS-10-046

Department of Health and Human Services

Participating Organizations
National Institutes of Health (NIH), (http://www.nih.gov)

Components of Participating Organizations
National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases (NIDDK), (http://www2.niddk.nih.gov/)   

Research Objectives

This research opportunity (Stimulating Hematology Investigation:  New Endeavors; hereafter referred to as SHINE) is intended to promote innovative, high quality hematology research relevant to the mission of The National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases (NIDDK).  In the SHINE program, NIDDK invites investigator-initiated research project grant applications in specific areas of basic and translational hematology research where needs and opportunities for progress are particularly timely.  Specific research topic areas supported by the SHINE program, as outlined below, will change over time and be up-dated annually through the NIH Guide to Grants and Contracts.

NIDDK has supported basic and translational hematology research since 1950 through a multi-faceted program described in the Institute’s web site: http://www2.niddk.nih.gov/Research/ScientificAreas/Hematology/.  Over the years, this research has generated important insights and enabling technologies that have not only led to progress in understanding and treating blood disorders but have also contributed to advances in biomedical science generally.  The SHINE program allows NIDDK to maintain a flexible, pro-active role in supporting timely, high impact, leading edge research by the hematology research community. 

New scientific knowledge to be achieved through research supported by the SHINE program will vary. In general, the knowledge gaps and research opportunities addressed by the SHINE program will include those that are defined and highlighted by NIDDK-sponsored workshops and other public meetings. 

Overall objectives of the SHINE program are to catalyze discoveries in basic molecular and cellular biology that provide new insights into the pathogenesis, prevention, detection, and potential treatment of disease, to attract new investigators into basic and translational hematology research, to promote productive interdisciplinary research collaborations, and to reinforce interactions and communication between NIDDK and the hematology research community. Because research topics featured in the SHINE program will change over time, the program will be dynamic and reflect evolving frontiers of hematology research needs and opportunities.

Specific research objectives supported by the SHINE program in this initial announcement are:

  • Ribosomes and Their Role in Disease

The purpose of this SHINE topic is to understand the role of disordered ribosome biogenesis and function in the pathogenesis of hematologic diseases.  A summary report of an NIDDK sponsored workshop (http://www3.niddk.nih.gov/fund/other/ribosomes/index.htm) outlines future directions of this emerging field. (http://www3.niddk.nih.gov/fund/other/RibosomeWorkshopSummariesandFutureDirections.pdf)  Research projects sought by this FOA include, but are not limited to, studies that address the following questions:

  • How are ribosomal protein (RP) genes coordinately regulated during hematopoiesis?  How is subunit stoichiometry regulated?  How are biogenesis and signaling affected by a defect in one RP, especially in erythroid cells? Are there tissue-specific characteristics of RP genes? Are RPs functioning in other roles besides being components of the ribosome?
  • Which genes are modifying severity of hematologic diseases, such as Diamond-Blackfan Anemia?  Are there genotype-phenotype correlations evident from point mutations or deletions of RP genes?
  • Can induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells provide an accurate model for the study of ribosomopathies?  Are there animal models that replicate the phenotype of hematologic diseases caused by disordered ribosome biogenesis?
  • How are RP genes, transcripts and/or proteins involved in cell cycle checkpoints or other significant signaling networks during hematopoiesis?

Non-erythroid Expression and Function of Erythropoietin Receptors

Research objectives of this SHINE topic are to understand the physiologic and pathophysiologic effects of erythropoietin receptor (EpoR) expression and function in non-erythroid cells.  An NIDDK-sponsored workshop titled, “Erythropoietin receptor (EpoR) expression and function in non-hematopoietic tissues” summarized experimental and clinical observations, as well as knowledge gaps, relevant to this research area:  http://www3.niddk.nih.gov/fund/other/eporeceptor2008/.  Research projects sought in this FOA may include, but are not limited to studies that address the following questions:

  • How is the expression of EpoR regulated in non-erythroid tissues?
  • Does EpoR signaling in non-erythroid cells differ from that observed in erythroid cells, and if so, what are the functional consequences of these differences?
  • Can effects of Epo on the survival, proliferation, and function of non-erythroid cells (e.g., vascular endothelial cells, myocytes, and neuronal cells) be determined and examined in in vitro and/or in vivo model systems that allow meaningful comparisons with those observed in normal erythroid cells?
  • Can animal models be generated that reproduce clinical effects (both putative beneficial and adverse) to provide resources that are amenable to rigorous studies of mechanisms underlying Epo effects?
  • Does Epo affect angiogenesis and vascular endothelial cell function and what are the underlying mechanisms for such effects, if demonstrable?
  • Can physiologic effects of Epo in non-erythroid tissues be distinguished from those elicited by exposure to non-physiologic, pharmacologic levels of Epo, as occurs with the clinical use of Epo?.

Heme Regulation during Erythropoiesis

Research objectives of this SHINE topic are to better understand the regulatory networks that link heme biosynthesis with normal and disordered erythropoiesis.  More than 80% of the heme synthesized in mammals occurs in the erythroid compartment.  This fundamental production of heme, primarily for hemoglobin synthesis, is regulated in order to maintain a balance of synthesis and degradation (homeostasis).  Recent discoveries of alternative functions of heme as co-factors have broadened understanding of its role in biologic processes, as discussed at a recent NIDDK workshop ( http://www3.niddk.nih.gov/fund/other/hemeregulation/index.htm) and are relevant to an evolving area of research addressed at another NIDDK workshop on “MicroRNA in Cellular Development and Hematopoiesis” http://www3.niddk.nih.gov/fund/other/microrna2007/index.htm was a previous workshop on. Specific research topics of grant applications for this topic may include, but are not limited to

  • How heme synthesis is coordinately regulated with globin chain synthesis in erythroid cells?
  • What is the mechanism of heme as a co-factor for microRNA processing under normal and anemic conditions?  What physiological roles does heme play as a co-factor in basic cellular processes?  And does altered homeostasis affect these processes?
  • Can model organisms be used to discover the mechanisms by which heme regulation occurs during erythropoiesis?
  • Using precise techniques, can intracellular heme be quantified and localized as it trafficks into and out of subcellular organelles?  What are the transport and chaperoning mechanisms involved with the movement of heme intracellularly?

Anemia of Inflammation and of Chronic Disease

The research objectives of this SHINE topic are to define pathogenetic mechanisms, biomarkers, and therapeutic targets relevant to the detection, prevention, and treatment of the anemia of inflammation and chronic disease.  See PAS-08-019 and http://www3.niddk.nih.gov/fund/other/workshopanemias/index.htm.  Research projects may include, but are not limited to studies that address the following questions: 

  • How does Bone Morphogenic Protein (BMP) signaling, hepcidin expression and the use of small effector molecules influence the rate of iron efflux?  Can this knowledge lead to development of therapeutics to alter iron efflux under anemic conditions?
  • What other cytokines influence distribution of iron within a cell or within an organ or cell type?
  • What is the pathogenesis and pathophysiology of anemia caused by inflammation or by chronic disease?  What contrasts and comparisons can be made with iron-deficient anemia or other classes of anemia, such as the anemia of aging?
  • How are mitochondrial and other subcellular functions affected in anemia of inflammation or of chronic disease?

Iron Overload

Research objectives of this SHINE topic are to better understand the genetic and molecular determinants that promote iron overload and to improve the clinical detection, measurement, and treatment of iron overload.  Research areas relevant to this FOA were addressed at an NIDDK workshop on “Iron Overload:  Mechanisms, Measurement and Management.” (http://www3.niddk.nih.gov/fund/other/ironoverload2008/). Research projects may include, but are not limited to, studies that address the following questions:

  • How do genetic and molecular determinants promote iron overload?
  • How can non-invasive, organ specific tissue iron measurement techniques be best standardized and applied for monitoring the clinical development of iron overload and the effectiveness of treatment by iron chelators?
  • How can new and existing iron chelator drugs be most effectively used, alone and in combination, to treat and/or prevent iron overload?

Each year, the specific objectives supported by the SHINE program will change in order to stay abreast with movement in the field.  The latest “hot topics” will be published in NOTICES in the NIH Guide to Grants and Contracts.  

Promoting Education and Outreach of Persons with Hereditary Blood Disorders: Identifying Patients with Diamond Blackfan Anemia.  Further Information may be found at: www.grants.gov

Bone Marrow Failure Research Program (BMFRP) FY09 BMFRP award mechanisms

BMFRP Exploration – Hypothesis Development Award

http://cdmrp.army.mil/funding/bmfrp.htm

http://cdmrp.army.mil/pubs/press/2009/09bmfrppreann.htm

NIH Challenge Grants

http://grants.nih.gov/grants/guide/rfa-files/RFA-OD-09-003.html

http://www.nhlbi.nih.gov/funding/nih-challenge-grants.html

Resequencing and Genotyping Service http://RSnG.nhlbi.nih.gov

NHLBI GENE THERAPY RESOURCE PROGRAM http://www.gtrp.org/

National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases (NIDDK) Challenge Grants http://www2.niddk.nih.gov/Recovery/challengegrants.htm

ARRA Administrative Supplements: http://grants.nih.gov/grants/guide/notice-files/NOT-OD-09-056.html
ARRA Competitive Revisions: http://grants.nih.gov/grants/guide/notice-files/NOT-OD-09-058.html
ARRA Summer Student supplements: http://grants.nih.gov/grants/guide/notice-files/NOT-OD-09-060.html
ARRA Challenge Grant RFA: http://grants.nih.gov/grants/guide/rfa-files/RFA-OD-09-003.html

Promoting Education and Outreach of Persons with Hereditary Blood Disorders: Identifying Patients with Diamond Blackfan Anemia.  Further Information may be found at: www.grants.gov

Bone Marrow Failure Research Program (BMFRP) FY09 BMFRP award mechanisms

BMFRP Exploration – Hypothesis Development Award

http://cdmrp.army.mil/funding/bmfrp.htm

http://cdmrp.army.mil/pubs/press/2009/09bmfrppreann.htm

NIH Challenge Grants

http://grants.nih.gov/grants/guide/rfa-files/RFA-OD-09-003.html

http://www.nhlbi.nih.gov/funding/nih-challenge-grants.html

Resequencing and Genotyping Service http://RSnG.nhlbi.nih.gov

NHLBI GENE THERAPY RESOURCE PROGRAM http://www.gtrp.org/

National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases (NIDDK) Challenge Grants http://www2.niddk.nih.gov/Recovery/challengegrants.htm

ARRA Administrative Supplements: http://grants.nih.gov/grants/guide/notice-files/NOT-OD-09-056.html
ARRA Competitive Revisions: http://grants.nih.gov/grants/guide/notice-files/NOT-OD-09-058.html
ARRA Summer Student supplements: http://grants.nih.gov/grants/guide/notice-files/NOT-OD-09-060.html
ARRA Challenge Grant RFA: http://grants.nih.gov/grants/guide/rfa-files/RFA-OD-09-003.html